Happy World Oceans Day!

Happy World Oceans Day!

stingray-web-mermaid-melissa-happy-world-oceans-day

World Oceans Day is June 8th:
The oceans are essential to food security and the health and survival of all life, power our climate and are a critical part of the biosphere. The official designation of World Oceans Day is an opportunity to raise global awareness of the current challenges faced by the international community in connection with the oceans.
World Oceans Day has been celebrated every 8 June since its original proposal in 1992 by Canada at the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. It was officially recognized by the United Nations in 2008. Since then it has been coordinated internationally by The Ocean Project with greater success and global participation each year.

mermaid melissa tropical island mermaid sighting beach

World Oceans Day is an annual observation to honor the world’s oceans, celebrate the products the ocean provides such as seafood as well as marine life itself for aquariums, pets, and also a time to appreciate its own intrinsic value. The ocean also provides sea-lanes for international trade. Global pollution and over-consumption of fish have resulted in drastically dwindling population of the majority of species.
The Ocean Project, working in partnership with the World Ocean Network, has been promoting WOD since 2003 with its network of over 1,600 ocean conservation organizations and others throughout the world. Events performed for WOD and awareness includes beach cleanups, educational programs, art contests, film festivals, and sustainable seafood events.

atlantis mermaid melissa performer with fish

The theme for this year is Healthy oceans, healthy planet. Explore the site to learn how you can hold an event for World Oceans Day, or take action for the ocean on your own.

World Oceans Day, held every June 8th, is the United Nations-recognized day of ocean celebration and action. People all over our blue planet organize celebrations – which can be a huge event in your community, a special announcement, or anything in between – to support action to protect the ocean.

mermaid sighting mermaid melissa shipwreck 3

Take the Better Bag Challenge:
Plastic trash is choking our ocean, and 80% of it comes from land.
We can do better!
The challenge: promise not take any disposable plastic bags for a whole year.
The solution starts with you.

deep shipwreck mermaid melissa real video underwater

You already know the ocean is in desperate need of protection – now share the ocean’s story with someone else for World Oceans Day.

revolution environmental film movie rob stewart world oceans day

Link To Watch: https://www.yekra.com/revolution

Revolution is a feature documentary about opening your eyes, changing the world and fighting for something. A true life adventure following director Rob Stewart in the follow up to his hit Sharkwater, Revolution is an epic adventure into the evolution of life on earth and the revolution to save us.
Discovering that there’s more in jeopardy than sharks, Stewart uncovers a grave secret threatening our own survival as a species, and embarks on a life-threatening adventure through 4 years and 15 countries into the greatest battle ever waged.

Bringing you some of the most incredible wildlife spectacles ever recorded, audiences are brought face to face with sharks and cuddly lemurs, into the microscopic world of the pygmy seahorse, and on the hunt with the deadly flamboyant cuttlefish. From the coral reefs in Papua New Guinea to the rain forests in Madagascar, Stewart reveals that our fate is tied to even the smallest of creatures.

mermaid-melissa-web-tail-splash-fluke-ocean

Through it all, Stewart’s journey reveals a massive opportunity, as activists and individuals all over the world are winning the battle to save the ecosystems we depend on for survival. Presenting the most important information on human survival and inspiring people all over the world to fight for life, Revolution is essential viewing for everyone. Startling, beautiful, and provocative, Revolution inspires audiences across the globe to join the biggest movement in history that’s rising to the challenge of saving our world.

mermaid melissa shipwreck underwater

It’s not too late! Easy last minute celebration ideas

Host a beach, river, lake, wetland, or underwater cleanup. Contact local dive and water sport shops to help organize and spread the word. You can recruit volunteers through the media, community posters, or local youth groups. Follow the cleanup with a celebratory dinner featuring sustainable seafood!

Get cleanup volunteers to “adopt” a local beach, river, lake, wetland, or underwater area to keep clean long after your World Oceans Day cleanup. Join forces with local environmental groups to help manage and provide resources to these volunteers.

mermaid melissa ship wreck

Petition to Recognize World Oceans Day in Your Community

Is World Oceans Day officially observed in your town or city, state, district, province, or nation? If not, follow our easy 5 step Community Proclamation & Petition Step By Step Guide to help your community join the growing list of those around the world who are making this unique celebration on June 8th an officially recognized annual event.

mermaid melissa mermaid tail splash

Create a community art

Getting your visitors, neighborhood, or any group of friendly folks together is a wonderful opportunity to make some art! Create a mural somewhere public – depict ocean animals, or display your community’s ocean promises. An even easier option is to do a sidewalk mural or art piece. You can even make eco-friendly sidewalk chalk at home!

mermaid melissa atlantis resort aquarium show

Clean up your favorite spot

It’s great to get hundreds of community members out cleaning the beach or river, but it’s not the only kind of cleanup that makes a difference! Grab a few friends or family members and make an outing of it. Go visit your favorite beach, river, lake, or park for a picnic and bring some bags for trash.

mermaid tail mermaid melissa fluke beautiful fin

Show a fantastic film

Try holding an environmental mini film festival at your school, at home with your friends and family, place of worship, or at a community center. Screen an environmentally-minded film such as The Story of Stuff or Food, Inc. Many of these films can be found on cheap or rental websites such as Netflix or Amazon, so check them out before buying.

Screen Revolution: Revolution is a feature documentary about opening your eyes, changing the world and fighting for something. A true life adventure following director Rob Stewart in the follow up to his hit Sharkwater, Revolution is an epic adventure into the evolution of life on earth and the revolution to save us. Screen Revolution through this link to give credit back to World Oceans Day!

ocean-floor-website-press

Spread the word about sustainable seafood

Invite friends and family over for a dinner party featuring locally, sustainably caught or farmed seafood and other (ideally) local foods. Click here to see some great recipes. Send your guests on their way with a full stomach, and a newly downloaded copy of a sustainable seafood app for their phones – try Seafood Watch if you’re in the US!

mermaid melissa professional mermaid performer real-life mermaid article huffington post

Wear blue, tell two

Wherever you work or play, you can make talking about World Oceans Day and ocean conservation easy. Just wear a blue shirt or other noticeable article of clothing and ask people if they know why! Share two facts about the ocean, or two ways that they can help protect it and its wildlife. Then – ask them to pass it on.

Mermaid Melissa Huffington Post Starfish sea stars article

Virtual and online

Use social media to share your ocean pride!

Share World Oceans Day with your friends and family however feels right for you. If you use social media, try writing a post about World Oceans Day. For people Facebook users, change your cover photo to this Healthy Oceans, Healthy Planet banner in solidarity with this year’s World Ocean’s Day Theme!

mermaid 11

Make an Ocean Promise in a Selfie for the Sea

Leading up to World Oceans Day on June 8, people all over the world are taking “Selfies for the Sea!” Have an Ocean Promise Party and take a photos and selfies of yourself doing something for the ocean or making a promise to do something that benefits our oceans and share it on social media with the tag #WorldOceansDay.

world oceans day videos

world oceans day video image

What is marine debris, and the Great Pacific Garbage Patch?

NOAA Ocean Today‘s TRASH TALK is a soon-to-be released special feature that introduces marine debris in an engaging, age-appropriate way. We invite everyone focusing on ocean plastic pollution to use this great, free video in your World Oceans Day celebrations.

Ocean Today is premiering this 15-minute TRASH TALK special feature for World Ocean Day. It is specially designed to be part of your World Ocean Day festivities and beyond. In addition to the video, we have a pre-recorded 10-minute webinar for educators that provides fun activities that you can organize after the film! A perfect event for museums, zoos, aquariums, learning centers and schools.

NARRATOR:

We love the ocean. And you love something, you want to protect it.

Unfortunately, the ocean is being filled with trash. And people all over the world who care about the health of the ocean are doing something about it. They’re talking trash and taking action.

You probably already recycle, and that’s a great start. So now, let’s talk about how you can prevent some of the surprising and sneaky ways that trash flows into our rivers and the ocean.

Come learn about marine debris and be part of the action.

mermaid-starfish-island-sea-star-mermaid-melissa-beach-tail

There’s a problem with trash in the ocean all over the world. People are generating more trash than ever, and sometimes that trash travels from cities to streams, rivers, bays, and then into the ocean, where it sometimes causes harm to coastal communities and wildlife.

This issue also costs communities money when people avoid beaches and bays because of all the trash.

Don’t you think it’s time all have an honest trash talk? We love the ocean, like you do, and we want to take care of it.

So the burning question I’m sure you’re all asking is, what is marine debris?

mermaid 13

Have you ever been to the beach and noticed litter, like plastic bottles or foam take-out containers on the sand? Or maybe you’ve been to a river or bay where there’s a car tire or bags stuck in the mud on the shore? Or a bunch of deflated balloons that say Happy Birthday floating in the water? All of that junk in the water, or on the shoreline, is considered marine debris. It’s anything solid and man-made in the ocean or Great Lakes that is not supposed to be there. And anything people use every day can become marine debris if they don’t dispose of it properly. And I mean anything!

The most common items we find when we do shoreline cleanups are plastics. But we also find rubber, cloth, glass, metal, and paper litter. Sometimes, the debris is so tiny, like a plastic microbead from your face wash, that you can barely see it in the water.

Marine debris is more than just trash in the ocean. Sometimes fishers lose their gear, like fishing traps, nets, or fishing line, and it continues to drift through the water, catching animals for a long time. We call that derelict fishing gear, and it’s marine debris. Have you ever seen an old boat left behind on a shoreline? Abandoned and derelict vessels are also marine debris.

So let’s review. Anything we use every day can become marine debris if we don’t dispose of it properly or if it goes into the water by accident. Marine debris can be very small, or can be very big, and anything in between. But most importantly, marine debris is one of the biggest pollution problems facing the world’s oceans and waterways today.

mermaid-melissa-ocean-professional-mermaid-for-hire-entertainer-website

Almost 4 in 10 Americans live in cities directly on the shoreline. So there’s a lot of trash generated from cities by the sea and the millions of people who visit our beaches. What might amaze you is all the other places trash can come from, and how far it can travel.

Marine debris comes from many different sources and enters the ocean in many ways.

Intentional littering and dumping are a big cause of marine debris. Sometimes the trash goes directly into the ocean, like when beachgoers don’t pick up after themselves. Or sometimes, marine debris is indirectly generated in a city hundreds of miles from the ocean. When someone litters on the street or parking lot, rainwater can move the trash into storm drains that empty into streams, rivers, and other bodies of water. Or, the wind can blow it there. Those rivers and streams can eventually carry the trash to the ocean.

Improper or careless waste disposal is another big cause. Have you ever seen an overflowing trash can, but for some reason, people keep putting trash there? Hello, marine debris! Or someone throws a piece of plastic in the trash, when it should have been recycled? Around the world, many people don’t have access to proper waste disposal or recycling – but the trash keeps piling up, and it has to go somewhere.

mermaid 16

It’s not just here on land – marine debris comes from activities out on the water, too. People on boats sometimes throw their trash overboard, and that’s against the law. Or, trash can accidentally fall, blow, or wash off vessels into the water. Sometimes fishers lose their fishing gear thanks to storms or passing vessels. Once the debris gets to the ocean, it is very difficult to trace the exact source.

The bottom line is, marine debris comes from us. Humans are the source, and every single person has the power – and the responsibility – to prevent it.

So yes, trash comes from cities, like right here in Washington, D.C., the nation’s capital. The Potomac River flows all the way into the Atlantic Ocean, and all kinds of stuff can end up in the water if people aren’t careful. The cherry blossoms are in bloom, and it’s beautiful. But look at how much trash people are creating. Bags and bottles can end up in the river, blown by the wind or washed down by the rain. We’re going to talk about solutions a little later on, but first, let’s have some trash talk about why we should care.

mermaid stingrays underwater cayman

How does marine debris impact the ocean, animals, and me?

Would you want to swim at a beach littered with trash? Of course not. And the animals who live in the ocean don’t either – the difference is they don’t have a choice.

Marine species often get tangled in debris, from fishing nets to six-pack rings. If they get caught, they could get injured or even die. Even if they don’t get entangled, many animals mistake plastic debris for food, and eat it. This fills their stomachs with junk they can’t digest.

Debris can also damage important habitats, like coral reefs, by breaking or smothering them. Corals serve as the base of the marine ecosystem, and impacts here can be felt all the way to you and me. Plus, plastics have harmful chemicals in them. Fish eat plastic. We eat fish. The question is, can those chemicals harm us? Marine debris also hurts the economy. It costs a lot of money to clean up, and people don’t want to go to dirty beaches. Boats and ships could run into large pieces of debris, too, or get their propellers tangled.

We need the ocean – and everything in it. And the ocean needs us to keep it free of debris.

mermaid 10

So now you’ve heard about all the different kinds of marine debris and their impacts on the ocean. That may seem far away from you, but really, the problem may start in your front yard. When we take out trash and recycling, we need to do a good job of keeping it contained, like we have here. But you can’t control it all. So when you pick up your trash and recycling cans, be sure to pitch in and pick up anything that may have fallen out. And they did a really good job.

There’s a lot of waste that does end up as marine debris. But by far, the most significant material that ends up in the ocean is plastic.

mermaid 12

Why is plastic marine debris so common?

We know there’s a lot of trash in the ocean. Unfortunately, a lot of it is plastic. We find plastic everywhere from the ocean’s floor to surface. The plastics are all shapes and sizes and all different types. We find it on beaches and inside animals’ stomachs or wrapped around their bodies. That’s bad news for our ocean and the animals that live in it or near it. It’s also bad news for us.

A recent study from the University of Georgia estimated that 8 million metric tons of plastic trash enters the ocean every year. That’s like putting five bags filled with plastic on every foot of coastline in the world. That’s a LOT of plastic in the ocean, and it’s there because… well, we put it there!

The 5 most common items found during the International Coastal Cleanup are plastic cigarette butts, food wrappers, plastic beverage bottles, plastic bottle caps, and plastic straws & drink stirrers. Notice anything in common with those things? It’s a lot of single-use, disposable plastic.

mermaid 2

It goes without saying – we produce too much waste. That waste ends up in the ocean when we litter or don’t recycle. Plastic is an important part of our modern lives – we use it for a lot of good things! But we need to take responsibility for how much we use every day and where it goes when we’re done with it.

The three R’s can help – and it’s up to every single one of us to practice them. Reduce the amount of disposable plastic you use. That’s anything you use once and throw away. Just use less. Reuse disposable plastics when possible. A plastic bottle makes a great coin piggy bank or watering can. The possibilities are endless. Recycle anything that can be recycled, so it stays out of landfills, where trash can blow away.

Ocean plastic is a huge problem that’s only going to get worse if we don’t change our ways. We can do better – for the ocean, and for us.

As you can see, trash can flow from your neighborhood into a drainpipe, then down into a stream like the one behind me, and believe it or not, it can make it all the way to the middle of the ocean.

mermaid-melissa-ocean-silhouette

What is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch?

Well first, let’s talk about what it’s not. It’s not a floating island of trash, like a garbage dump or a landfill. It’s also not the only patch. They exist all throughout the ocean, and the Pacific Garbage Patch just happens to be the most famous.

Garbage patches are large areas of marine debris concentration that are formed by rotating ocean currents called gyres – kind of like big whirlpools that suck things in. A garbage patch is made up of tiny plastic pieces called “microplastics” that are less than 5 millimeters long. It’s more like pepper flakes swirling in a soup than something you can skim off the surface. You might come across some larger items, like plastic bottles, but it’s possible to sail through a garbage patch and not see anything. And they’re a big problem, for the ocean – and us.

People often ask why we can’t just scoop up all the marine debris in the ocean, and the answer is: unfortunately, it’s just not that simple.

The first challenge is the sheer size of these garbage patches. They’re huuuuuge! They’re constantly moving with ocean currents. And there’s debris from the ocean’s surface all the way down to the sea floor. Not to mention all the marine life we would disrupt if we tried to just scoop up debris.

mermaid 7

So what can we do? Well, the ultimate solution is prevention and we need to keep that as our highest priority. We can reduce, reuse, and recycle to keep trash out of the ocean in the first place. And we can participate in things like shoreline cleanups. It’s a lot easier to deal with debris before we get to the ocean.

Because until we stop marine debris at the source, we’ll just be cleaning it up forever.

Communities across the country are coming up with innovative ways to prevent debris from leaving the watershed, like this water wheel here in Baltimore. And also in D.C., Missouri, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Honolulu. Innovative solutions are popping up everywhere.

Look at all this trash. As you can see, we really need to work on stopping debris at the source. This is one way cities are working on it, but what can you do?

Let’s dive into how we can prevent trash from entering the water in the first place.

mermaiad 5

What can we do about marine debris?

A lot of the trash that’s in our ocean is plastic, and that marine debris is hurting our environment, economy, and health. The problem will only get worse unless we change the way we consume and dispose of products.

Some people may say, well, I’m just one person, so I can’t make a difference. But that’s just not true! If each person who creates trash (and that’s just about everyone) took action, it would add up to a lot of change.

There are solutions, and together, we can prevent litter from ending up in the ocean. So what can we do? Well, the ultimate solution is prevention, and we need to keep that as our highest priority. We can reduce, reuse, and recycle to keep debris out of the ocean in the first place. You can bring your own shopping bag, drink out of a reusable bottle, and participate in things like a shoreline cleanup. Join a group cleaning the beach, or grab some friends and clean up your street! It’s easy. Be more conscious of how many disposable plastic items you’re using, and if you do – where are you putting it…in the recycling bin or the trash can?

atlantis mermaid shipwreck bahamas mermaid melissa
atlantis mermaid shipwreck bahamas mermaid melissa

So here’s a challenge: the next time you finish using a throw-away item: a bag, bottle, or utensil, answer the question, “Where is this going?” Because ultimately when you throw stuff away, there really is no away…it has to go somewhere.

So keep asking yourself this important question…How will you keep your trash from becoming marine debris?

Human beings are creating this problem, and it’s unhealthy for us, the Earth, and all the creatures depending on it.

But we can come together and build a movement and change our relationship with trash. Which is why we’re encouraging everyone to have a trash talk with your friends, neighbors, family, and even city officials.
So we’re all in this together. And if we focus on solutions and prevention, we can make the ocean and the Earth a healthy home for everyone.

NARRATOR:

What is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch?

Well first, let’s talk about what it’s not. It’s not a floating island of trash, like a garbage dump or a landfill. It’s also not the only patch. They exist all throughout the ocean, and the Pacific Garbage Patch just happens to be the most famous.

Garbage patches are large areas of marine debris concentration that are formed by rotating ocean currents called gyres – kind of like big whirlpools that suck things in. A garbage patch is made up of tiny plastic pieces called “microplastics” that are less than 5 millimeters long. It’s more like pepper flakes swirling in a soup than something you can skim off the surface. You might come across some larger items, like plastic bottles, but it’s possible to sail through a garbage patch and not see anything. And they’re a big problem, for the ocean – and us.

People often ask why we can’t just scoop up all the marine debris in the ocean, and the answer is: unfortunately, it’s just not that simple.

mermaid melissa fish follow atlantis resort

The first challenge is the sheer size of these garbage patches. They’re huuuuuge! They’re constantly moving with ocean currents. And there’s debris from the ocean’s surface all the way down to the sea floor. Not to mention all the marine life we would disrupt if we tried to just scoop up debris.

So what can we do? Well, the ultimate solution is prevention and we need to keep that as our highest priority. We can reduce, reuse, and recycle to keep trash out of the ocean in the first place. And we can participate in things like shoreline cleanups. It’s a lot easier to deal with debris before we get to the ocean.
Because until we stop marine debris at the source, we’ll just be cleaning it up forever.

NARRATOR:

How does marine debris impact the ocean, animals, and me?

Would you want to swim at a beach littered with trash? Of course not. And the animals who live in the ocean don’t either – the difference is they don’t have a choice.

Marine species often get tangled in debris, from fishing nets to six-pack rings. If they get caught, they could get injured or even die. Even if they don’t get entangled, many animals mistake plastic debris for food, and eat it. This fills their stomachs with junk they can’t digest.

Debris can also damage important habitats, like coral reefs, by breaking or smothering them. Corals serve as the base of the marine ecosystem, and impacts here can be felt all the way to you and me. Plus, plastics have harmful chemicals in them. Fish eat plastic. We eat fish. The question is, can those chemicals harm us? Marine debris also hurts the economy. It costs a lot of money to clean up, and people don’t want to go to dirty beaches. Boats and ships could run into large pieces of debris, too, or get their propellers tangled.
We need the ocean – and everything in it. And the ocean needs us to keep it free of debris.

mermaid-stringray-ocean-swimming-mermaid-melissa-professional-mermaid-entertainer-website


mermaid melissa websitemermaid melissa websitemermaid melissa websitemermaid melissa website
mermaid melissa websitemermaid melissa websitemermaid melissa websitemermaid melissa websitemermaid melissa websitemermaid melissa websitemermaid melissa websitemermaid melissa websitemermaid melissa websitemermaid melissa websitemermaid melissa websitemermaid melissa websitemermaid melissa websitemermaid melissa website
mermaid melissa website

PRESS:
Daily Mail, DAZED, Cosmopolitan, Seventeen, Huffington Post, The Mirror, Inquisitr, The CHIVE, Viral Thread, Le Journal De Montreal, Epoch Times, Priceonomics, Pop Culture Online, MADONNA24, Deccan Chronicle, Daily Bhaskar, Wikitree Global, VIVA Austria, Rant Chic, and other stories featuring Mermaid Melissa will be updated with clickable links below:

Dazed Magazine: Meet a real-life mermaid
“Why one Florida activist turned herself into a mermaid to advocate for the oceans”
http://www.dazeddigital.com/artsandculture/article/24982/1/meet-a-real-life-mermaid

MailOnline & DailyMail:
“A real life Little Mermaid! Blonde free diver inspired by Disney classic changes her name to ‘mermaid’ as he says she wears her ‘tail’ everyday and can hold her breath underwater for five minutes”
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3107562/A-real-life-Little-Mermaid-Blonde-free-diver-inspired-Disney-classic-wears-tail-everyday-hold-breath-underwater-five-minutes.html

Huffington Post: “Professional Mermaid Gets Along Swimmingly With Ocean Sea Life (Mostly)”
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/05/26/mermaid-melissa_n_7444868.html

Cosmopolitan: “15 Photos of a Real-Life Mermaid You Have to See to Believe”
http://www.cosmopolitan.com/lifestyle/news/a41074/photos-of-real-life-mermaid/

Hungarian Cosmopolitan.hu: “Elképesztő: 10 éve sellőként él egy lány”
“Ha azt hitted, hogy Élő Barbie után már nem jöhet sokkolóbb, akkor nagyot tévedtél! Egy fiatal csajszi, Melissa Dawn ugyanis már évek óta hableánynak képzeli magát.”
http://www.cosmopolitan.hu/body_love/2015/05/28/elkepeszto-10-eve-sellokent-el-egy-lany/

Seventeen:
“15 Photos of a Real-Life Mermaid You Have to See to Believe”
“Bonus: This mermaid’s for hire!”
http://www.seventeen.com/life/news/a31133/photos-of-real-life-mermaid/

The Mirror: “Stunning images show ‘mermaid’ at play as she swims with a group of deadly stingrays”
http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/weird-news/stunning-images-show-mermaid-play-5772417

The CHIVE: Mermaid Melissa loves the sea (10 Photos)
http://thechive.com/2015/05/30/mermaid-melissa-loves-the-sea-10-photos/

Inquisitr: “Meet Mermaid Melissa Who Swims With The Ocean’s Sea Life Including Sharks”
http://www.inquisitr.com/2122199/meet-mermaid-melissa-who-swims-with-the-oceans-sea-life-including-sharks/
http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/inspired/1329862-professional-mermaid-teaches-people-how-to-protect-ocean-animals/

Viral Thread: “Meet The Professional Mermaid Who Is Living The Dream”
http://www.viralthread.com/meet-the-professional-mermaid-who-is-living-the-dream/

MADONNA24: Diese Meerjungfrau ist ECHT!
“Melissa Dawn aus Florida ist die einzige Meerjungfrau der Welt!” (German Magazine Press)
http://madonna.oe24.at/thema/Diese-Meerjungfrau-ist-ECHT/190714557

Epoch Times “Epoch Inspired” Feature:
“Professional Mermaid Teaches People, How to Protect Ocean Animals”
http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/inspired/1329862-professional-mermaid-teaches-people-how-to-protect-ocean-animals/

“Meet the ‘Real-Life Mermaid’ Who Shows No Fear While Swimming With Deadly Stingrays”

http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/inspired/1372454-meet-the-real-life-mermaid-who-shows-no-fear-while-swimming-with-deadly-stingrays/

Priceonomics: “Life as a Professional Mermaid”
http://priceonomics.com/life-as-a-professional-mermaid/

Stunning Images Show ‘Mermaid’ At Play With Deadly Stingrays
http://www.96fm.com.au/entertainment/the-feed/stunning-images-show-mermaid-at-play-with-deadly-stingrays

Rant Chic: “This Professional Mermaid Looks So Convincing, She’s Fooled The Animals”
http://www.rantchic.com/2015/05/27/this-professional-mermaid-looks-so-convincing-shes-fooled-the-animals/

Liputan6: “Mengenal Melissa Si Putri Duyung Profesional” (Indonesian TV)
http://global.liputan6.com/read/2243322/mengenal-melissa-si-putri-duyung-profesional

Mermaid Melissa guest stars on “Pop Culture Tonight”
Listen to the segment: http://popculturetonight.com/mermaid-melissa-mike-suby/

Deccan Chronicle
“Meet the world’s most ‘real-life’ mermaid”
http://www.deccanchronicle.com/150527/lifestyle-offbeat/gallery/meet-world’s-most-‘real-life’-mermaid

Daily Bhaskar: “The secret behind this beautiful lady’s earnings will leave you stunned: Melissa Dawn is a professional model who performs as a mermaid.” (India News)
http://daily.bhaskar.com/news/WOR-melissa-dawn-real-life-mermaid-performs-to-save-the-water-ecosystem-5009199-PHO.html

Le Journal De Montreal: L’incroyable vie de la sirène humaine (Montréal, Québec Canada)
http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2015/05/31/lincroyable-vie-de-la-sirene-humaine

Diariodigital: “Conheça Melissa, uma sereia de verdade”
“As sereias são retratadas em diversos livros e filmes, mas uma norte-americana fez disso uma carreira. Mermaid Melissa (Sereia Melissa) – sim, ela mudou legalmente o seu nome – nada um pouco por todo o mundo com uma gigantesca cauda de sereia. ” (Portuguese Newspaper)
http://diariodigital.sapo.pt/news.asp?id_news=775054

Wikitree Global (Korean Press)
‘살아있는 인어공주’ 매일 바다를 수영하는 멜리사
http://www.wikitree.co.kr/main/news_view.php?id=220403

VIVA Austria: “Arielle, die Meerjungfrau, lebt und zwar in Florida” (Germany)
http://www.viva.tv/news/73905-arielle-die-meerjungfrau-lebt-und-zwar-in-florida

Pink Blog: (Italian)
“Melissa Mermaid, la storia della donna diventata sirena”
http://www.pinkblog.it/post/310850/melissa-mermaid-la-storia-della-donna-diventata-sirena

NOW News: (China)
真人版小美人魚 水中閉氣可長達5分鐘:
美國佛羅里達州一位水中表演者梅麗莎(Melissa Dawn)從事小美人魚的工作已逾10年,而她還有一項特殊的技能,就是「憋氣5分鐘」。(圖/翻攝《每日郵報》)
http://www.nownews.com/n/2015/06/09/1714104

ETtoday China News: 真實版小美人魚,水中閉氣5分鐘,下同。
10年練就水中閉氣5分鐘 正妹真的變成美人魚了!
http://www.ettoday.net/news/20150604/516085.htm

光明日报社 光明网: 美国女子改名美人鱼 我有话说
美国女子改名美人鱼 (China press)
http://www.gmw.cn/cg/2015-06/08/content_15910091.htm

Yahoo News China: 【現實都有美人魚?!】美國「長氣婦」人魚合一 可潛入水底5分鐘
https://hk.news.yahoo.com/5-082022239.html

Boa Informação: (Portuguese)
Conheça Melissa, a Pequena Sereia da vida real
http://boainformacao.com.br/2015/06/conheca-melissa-a-pequena-sereia-da-vida-real/

Vietnamese News:
Khám phá cuộc sống dưới đáy biển của nàng tiên cá đời thực
Với ước mơ trở thành nhân vật cổ tích từ bé, Melissa đang và sẽ tiếp tục theo đuổi đam mê trở thành nàng tiên cá.
http://giaoducthoidai.vn/khoa-hoc/kham-pha-cuoc-song-duoi-day-bien-cua-nang-tien-ca-doi-thuc-1008010.html